Dutch Baby for One

One of my go-to brunch foods is the super-easy Dutch Baby, or Big Pancake (it has lots of names, it’s always Dutch Baby to me). This giant puffy pancake starts life as an unassuming puddle of batter in a well-buttered pan on the stove, and through magic in the oven becomes a puffy, crispy giant popover of awesomeness. And it’s super easy, so easy that I can start it before the coffee is ready and still be confident of success.

The standard Dutch Baby recipe is kind of huge, serving 6-8. That’s totally fine when we’re feeding a hungover household, but sometimes nobody else is home, and I need a little Dutch Baby love. Thus, the “for one” adaptation.

When I make a full-sized recipe, I use the blender, though I have done it by hand to equally acceptable effect. Today we’re using the immersion blender, because it’s easy. If you don’t have one, a fork will do the job just fine (the batter volume here is a little too small for normal-sized blenders.)

Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

Combine milk, egg, sugar, salt, and flour. Blend together until flour is fully incorporated and batter is smooth. Let it rest up to half an hour. You can use it immediately, but giving the gluten time to relax will yield a more tender pancake.

Melt butter in small frying pan over medium high heat. Add pancake batter, allow to bubble just a moment, then put it in the oven for 20-25 minutes. (I like mine good and brown, so I always cook them 25 minutes, but your mileage may vary.)

Remove from oven, transfer carefully to a plate, dust with powdered sugar and lemon juice (or whatever you like on your pancakes), and enjoy! I love the way that every Dutch Baby has a character all its own – no two ever look quite the same!

There are lots of variations on this out there in recipe-land – often calling for vanilla or cinnamon in the batter. I have made it with half wheat flour and half cornmeal, which turns out pretty well. That version also had fresh herbs in the batter, and we used bacon fat instead of butter. Best. Baby. Ever.